PTSD

Help for PTSD

For those who have experienced a traumatic event, it may be difficult to go about their daily life at first. It’s normal for sufferers of trauma to experience upsetting memories and sleep disturbances. Many people eventually get over these symptoms as time goes on - some take months or years before the effects are gone completely, but most do recover with time.

However, others can still feel haunted by their past and experience symptoms that can greatly interfere with daily life. PTSD doesn't always show up immediately after an incident or stay in remission forever; sometimes anxiety attacks come back months or years later when one least expects them while at other times fear bubbles below the surface ready to resurface whenever triggered. This is simply due to our brains' neurology in response to major traumatic events such as accidents causing bodily harm to oneself or merely witnessing a trauma happening to another individual. This includes the traumas that can occur during war.

If you're struggling with thoughts and feelings from the trauma for more than a few months, you may be showing symptoms of PTSD . Symptoms can include flashbacks to what happened during the traumatic event, nightmares about it happening again in your sleep, feeling like your always on edge or constantly waiting for something terrible to happen next - even if nothing bad has occurred recently. Some people also have trouble concentrating due to emotional energy spent living in fear every day that they may get hurt or killed at any moment. If these types of experiences are disrupting your life over an extended period, such as weeks or months, this could indicate post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

If one is exposed directly to trauma and/or injured during a traumatic incident, even if they were unharmed - they are more likely than others who were not in close proximity to develop these symptoms, and so it’s important to keep in mind when assessing their risk for PTSD development. It's essential that we don't stigmatize those with this condition, but rather learn how best to support them through whatever difficult journey might lie ahead once they have been diagnosed with such an issue so often found among veterans of war and other victims alike. PTSD does not discriminate. It can happen to any person, no matter how strong they are or what kind of life experience they have had up until that point. For example, if someone was directly exposed to trauma and injured during the event, there is a higher likelihood for them developing PTSD than somebody who wasn't involved at all but were still distressed and affected by the incident through TV news coverage.

Symptoms of PTSD

Memory- Individuals with PTSD have a hard time coping when they are reminded of their traumatic event. When the date comes around, flashbacks and nightmares may occur without warning. These memories can feel overwhelming to those who deal with them frequently or on a regular basis; but fortunately, there is help available for sufferers in need which can help to curb these painful reminders into manageable ones that won't keep you up at night any longer! People living with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) often suffer from an inability to cope during periods of trauma triggered by certain events, thoughts about past occurrences, conversations associated with it, such as anniversaries etc., as well as feelings such as being overwhelmed - all symptoms stemming from repeated exposure through either internal stimuli or external triggers caused.

Volatile Mood - The victim of a traumatic event is often bombarded with thoughts and feelings related to blame, estrangement, or difficult memories. The intensity can be so extreme that it becomes too much for the person to handle on their own. The aftermath of experiencing something horrific typically riddles an individual with negative emotions like shame, guilt and anger, and surprisingly even positive ones, such as excitement about what occurred - or the actions they took in order to survive. These strong reactions may intensify over time which can lead people who are currently coping by themselves to relive these events, in part because they may isolate themselves and do not have the support system around to anchor them and remind them how far away from that trauma they now are.

Neglect - Some people who experience trauma may turn to substance use as a coping mechanism. These individuals will often avoid friends and family, lose interest in hobbies they previously found pleasure from, or develop feelings of detachment and isolation with their loved ones that they did not experience before the incident took place. It is important if you have been impacted by traumatic events not only to find healthy ways to cope, but also explore new avenues which were unfamiliar to you prior to the event occurring, such as joining social groups where you feel more accepted, or taking up an activity like painting at your local art center.

Anxiety - Often, these symptoms may be signs of trauma. They could also come from an emotional event that's causing distress or anxiety in the person experiencing them, such as a big presentation coming up soon and are feeling stressed and anxious,for example. Often, when people experience extreme emotions like excessive anger; difficulty showing affection to others including friends and family members; having outbursts all the time etc., it can lead to medical problems, such as physical bodily reactions including increased blood pressure and heart rate (and these are just two symptoms among many). Getting professional help is often needed for emotions that feel out of control, because if left unchecked these symptoms may continue getting worse over time - both emotionally and physically.

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