What you need to know about PTSD

What you need to know about PTSD

Everyone will experience some kind of stress throughout their life. When an emotional response to a stressful or horrific event impairs a person's ability to cope, it is often considered traumatic. While trauma does not always directly lead to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), it is wise to understand some underlying behaviors so you can help manage/control PTSD. Studies have shown that PTSD affects 10% of women and 4% of men at some point in their lives. It can vary in severity, with one third experiencing the most severe symptoms including flashbacks, sleep problems and being easily startled.

PTSD can affect anyone, and symptoms vary depending on the individual. This condition doesn't discriminate – it affects people of all ages regardless of their background or circumstances. The experience may be different for everyone who has PTSD, so paying attention to small details in behaviors can help. Symptoms appear differently, such as instantly after a traumatic event or even decades later with delayed onset where symptoms start to surface slowly as time goes on. There is no definitive answer to why some people who experience trauma develop PTSD and others do not. To understand this, we must consider a combination of elements that may contribute to the disorder or make individuals more susceptible to post-traumatic stress, such as:

Many people associate PTSD with military members. However, one does not have to experience a specific event in order for them to develop PTSD. In fact, witnessing an accident can be enough of a trauma that it causes symptoms associated with PTSD (like intense physical reactions and emotions from painful memories). The same thing happens when children or teenagers face severe traumas which cause these sorts of behaviors. This is becoming even more common among younger populations than adults.

PTSD is a disorder that can impact many people's lives. It has been estimated to affect around 10% of Americans at some point in their life, and while there are several symptoms associated with this condition, it often goes undiagnosed. Symptoms may include physical pain or discomfort - such as headaches, nausea, shortness of breath; insomnia/nightmares, or feeling constantly on guard for danger. When trying to determine if you or a loved one are living with PTSD, it’s important to remember that symptoms may not show up immediately. In fact, many people have reported experiencing symptoms of the disorder years after being exposed to trauma.

Seeking treatment for trauma as soon as possible is the most effective way to recover. Two of these treatments—medications and therapy—both have benefits on their own but are even better when combined together. Psychiatric help can take place in one-on-one meetings or group settings with your physician. Therapy helps many people suffering from PTSD feel relief by allowing them an open space to discuss whatever they need help understanding about what happened during a traumatic experience while also working through the memory itself. Talking can help people re-evaluate their memories, build skills for coping with trauma and feel supported. It is important to be able to discuss these difficult topics that are often brought up by talk therapy sessions in order to provide the necessary support a person needs after experiencing something traumatic.

In addition to a patient receiving medication and/or therapy, it is helpful for family members to be involved. Family members should learn about PTSD so they can understand what their loved ones may be going through. They need to know that PTSD is treatable so that they can provide support by reaching out and staying positive in the face of adversity. Living with PTSD can be difficult, but there are many treatments that have been successful in helping people live healthier lives. Thankfully, here at Empire Psychiatry New York , we have the experiences to provide relief for your needs. We have created a system with the goal of providing peace of mind for our patients. We have come up with this mission after working closely and understanding the needs of thousands of patients to provide better service than anyone else in our industry! For more information or help with your PTSD, send us an email, or contact us today.

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